Episode #16 – 3 Steps to Getting Your First Paid Recording Gig

In this episode, we share three steps to getting your first paid recording gig. And in the quick tip, Joe shares a way to limit the “back and forth dance” of recording yourself.

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For more information about us:

Graham Cochrane – www.TheRecordingRevolution.com

Joe Gilderwww.HomeStudioCorner.com

6 thoughts on “Episode #16 – 3 Steps to Getting Your First Paid Recording Gig”

  1. Graham and Joe: Thanks mucho for your seminar! Very fine info for the musician trying to get started with a recording business. I am a composer/recording his own stuff with no paid experience and am limited in gear to an Apple Mountain Lion/Windows Bootcamp (XP) set up. I write my music into Sibelius 5 music writing software, and then export my finished pieces into Steinberg Wavelab 7 recording/editing software. My midi interface for a Korg T3 keyboard is a Tascam 144mk-11. The two main recording problems I’m presently trying to overcome are:
    1. Latency issues due to insufficient RAM memory which produce hick-up pauses in playback, and which I am unsure how to correct with additional or different equipment, and
    2. How to find out the best plan and process for getting my music replicated to the current best standard of sound quality (Wavelab will produce to Redbook 16-bit, but also has 32-bit floating point capability). I have heard that a fully commercial master produced at a big studio uses an actual master made of gold, and am unclear how this master is obtained and manufactured (with a view to the question of what would I need to make my own.)
    A little further clarifying background on my circumstance:
    a. I’ve been writing and copywriting my original jazz fusion pieces about 10 years.
    b. I’ve never actually performed in a working commercial ensemble, just jammed with other musicians.
    c. I just turned 63, and my lifelong goal is mainly to get my music onto the web, and hopefully get it either sold or performed, and hopefully both.

    Thanks again for your valuable insights. Any other knowledge you feel moved to impart, would be gratefully appreciated.

    Clyde Rollins

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